9 series with which you know other countries and other customs – Freiburg

We love getting to know other countries, especially when we travel. Since vacations are only possible to a limited extent due to Corona, the editors at fudder did a search via Netflix. And I found 9 series to learn about other cultures.

illuminated

Four seasons, eight episodes and more seasons are planned. No wonder, because the Spanish series “lite” has ended up in Netflix trends all over the world!
A murder takes place in an elite Spanish school, which is gradually solved with episode after episode flashbacks, until the last episode finally brings you to the day of the event. Lots of suspense, but not just a murder mystery. Also in the foreground is the drama of life at the “Las Encinas” school. Three poor students come to the elite school with a scholarship and are welcomed here by some with more, others with less enthusiasm. Chic parties, student hostility, lots of love dramas and a murder on top of that, with “quarrel” it sure doesn’t get boring in any episode. (Selma Leipold)

Anne with an E

Vibrant Anne was orphaned by brothers Matthew and Marilla and grows up on the quaint Green Gables farm. The “Anne with an E” series unleashes feelings of pure happiness. Immersed in Canadian country life in 1896, Anne witnesses her ups and downs through puberty and her vivid imagination. She talks about friendship and love, family and growth and how Anne, with her special way, gradually changes the whole town for the better. The drama series has a decelerating effect due to the idyllic backdrop of the Canadian island and can only warm your heart with Anne’s nature. The best series to escape from everyday life and get off completely. (Jana Kohlschtter)

euphoria

After 10 minutes of “Euphoria”, I really didn’t want to do another teen drama in a high school full of hormones. But then minute eleven came and – yes, forget everything you’ve ever seen about US teenage narratives: “Euphoria” is colorful (mostly purple, with lots of glitter), it’s trendy (mostly Zendaya, with lots of glitter), it’s eye-catching , sometimes scary, sad, funny, romantic and most of all: fantastic.

Images that pop up in people’s minds when they hear the keyword America? Mass, oversize, volume, guns, drugs – extremes. The HBO series “Euphoria”, produced by A24, plays with the prejudices of non-US people and leaves behind a wave of excitement and euphoria, even after the screens have gone black and the credits have long since disappeared.

The protagonist Rue (unreliable narrator at best), played by Zendaya, has a drug problem. She methamphetamine, heroin and Xanax. Producer Sam Levinson has long been involved in drug abuse and forms his main character in part with his own experiences in the fight against drugs. This makes Rue real, this makes it accessible – to the emotional disadvantage of viewers. She is in love (yes, no, maybe?) With her best friend, Jules – who, after moving from boy to girl, is finding her place in a prejudiced world that, at 17, is suburban and high school. Grab some handkerchiefs: The most unstable TV characters of recent years promise a wild ride.

Not a light fare, but a good one. Kind of like going too fast on one of those old retro rides that you still don’t want to get off until you get dizzy. (Lisa Discher)

The house of flowers

The Mexican family drama “Flowery Prospects” (originally “La casa de las flores”) begins with a bang: The wealthy De La Moras family finds a dead body on their property at the birthday party of the head of the family, Ernesto. The birthday girl’s secret lover took his own life. In the flower shop, of all places, in the hands of the family clan for generations. The rosy idyll, which the De La Mora are only too happy to preserve outwardly, seems to be crumbling. A series of more or less dark secrets come to light. But for the extended family, blood is denser than water. Do the De La Mora stick together – at all costs? A fun blend of soap opera and black humor.

Las Chicas del Cable / Telephone operators

This Spanish drama series is set in Spain in the 1920s. Four women work as telephone operators in Madrid and become best friends there. They are all emancipated women fighting for equality that simply did not exist at the time. Issues such as violence in marriage, paternalism of women, homosexuality and transsexuality are addressed.
In addition to the dramas of love and friendship, there is talk of the development of Spain up to the years of the civil war. A really good series for anyone who loves historical drama! Unfortunately, the series gets worse and becomes more unrealistic from season three onwards. (Selma Leipold)

house of money

Sergio Marquina, also known as the Professor, is the leader of a gang that tries to do what Sergio’s father failed years ago: rob the Spanish banknote printer in Madrid. The series may no longer be an insider tip for many, everyone has surely seen Dal’s red dress and famous mask at a carnival parade or Halloween party. Above all, it is one thing: authentic. Ahead of the series, the creators considered how to circumvent the safety precautions of the respective locations. Among other things, they relied on amateur actors who also know this profession professionally. In short: like the gang itself, the whole thing was approached with a certain plan.

“House of Money”, originally “Casa de papel”, succeeds like no other series in transferring the Stockholm Syndrome to the viewer. This is particularly evident in the protagonist himself, the professor. lvaro Morte plays his role with such conviction that the audience feels manipulated by him and eager to work for him in this game of cat and mouse. Sometimes it is one step ahead of the police or has to pay for its members’ mistakes as quickly as possible. (Philip Findling)

Unorthodox

The Netflix miniseries is inspired by the book of the same name by Deborah Feldman. It tells the story of Esther, a young woman who belongs to the ultra-Orthodox religious community of Satmar Hasid. She steps out of her life, which is heavily controlled by her community and her arranged marriage, and flees from New York to Berlin, as her mother did a few years ago. Hoping for a self-determined life, free from religious constraints, she tries to build a life in Berlin and learns what freedom can mean. Although most of it is set in Berlin, the series makes you feel how the world feels to Esther and offers insights into her religion. A short digression that appears very authentic thanks to the inclusion of the Yiddish language and brings the culture a little closer. (Jana Kohlschtter)

your last hour

The Spaniards know how to produce exciting series. The next coup on our list is called “Your Last Lesson” (original title El desorden que dejas) and is about the young teacher Raquel (breathtaking: Inma Cuesta), who moves with her husband to her hometown in Galicia. A few weeks earlier, there was a murder case at her new school, in which Raquel gradually gets involved. Raquel’s predecessor Viruca appears in flashbacks and allegedly took his own life. From school to shots of the Spanish countryside to actresses: this series enchants you in different ways and allows you to immerse yourself in Spanish worlds. Of course, if you can, watch it in Spanish. (Gina Kutkat)

Crash landing on you

From Squid Game, everyone can imagine something about the South Korean series. But the psychological thriller series shows only one side of the South Korean series industry. There is another world of series, very kitschy, whose dramas are often told according to the same pattern: 16 episodes, at least an hour and a half per episode, many kitschy, bad, misleading cliffhangers and still a very special charm, which one after two or three episodes gave way. A masterpiece of this kind is “Crash landing on you”, which aired in 2019-2020. The story is rather unrealistic, but the implementation is humane and somewhat authentic: a wealthy but lonely South Korean businesswoman ended up paragliding through a storm beyond the 38th parallel. In North Korea, she is discovered and hidden by a stern but kind North Korean officer. Interestingly, a North Korean migrant helped with the script and production. And exciting: the razor’s edge on which realization must move. Because in South Korea it is forbidden to publicly make propaganda for the North Korean regime. On the other hand, the producers of the series did not want to burden the difficult relationship between the two Koreas with the series. (Anika Maldacker)

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